Diary Of A Crossword Fiend

Diary Of A Crossword Fiend

Is cluing tougher than designing a grid? Designing and filling the grid is my favourite a part of the development process. It was a Newsday puzzle in 2003. I still remember going to the Newsday website and seeing my name above the grid. It was great to luxuriate in a crossword for twice as long as a typical Saturday NYT, and great to have a stern problem that did not contain resisting the temptation to Google some obscure name. It’s sometimes troublesome, but I love the challenge. It’s not unusual for me to finish a grid in two or three hours after which not get around to writing all the clues for a week or more. It’s enjoyable to give you clues for theme entries and the longer, more fascinating entries, however writing clues for common phrases like Area, ERIE, ORE, and so on., is a real drag. Writing clues is my least favourite part. Coming up with a theme is often the toughest a part of the method for me. I helped to craft the precise theme answers that were used in puzzle, after which I constructed the grid. You and Barry Silk created a “Cruciverbalist” puzzle for brand spanking new York Times in Feb. For those who didn’t have the chance to unravel the puzzle, can you clarify your creating process once more?

You seem to be fond of synonym themed puzzle, just like the “Oops” (FALL, Trip, TUMBLE and SLIP) we had on Oct 8, 2008. Is that your signature? Did he look for distinctive prospects (i.e., might RSTTHTP be anything other than rise to the highest?) or entries that could poss